inneroptics:

Holly Wilmeth - iguana

inneroptics:

Holly Wilmeth - iguana

(via salahmah)

(Source: itsmefabulous, via lillyunique)

(Source: salahmah)

tastefullyoffensive:

[berniethecatch]

tastefullyoffensive:

[berniethecatch]

(Source: whyrywhy, via space-rockets)

americanapparel:

Anna Karina / Une femme est une femme (1961) dir.Jean-Luc Godard

(Source: alsk00, via ollygolightly25)

iluvskinnybitches:

amanda riley

iluvskinnybitches:

amanda riley

"

The issue isn’t whether you should go to law school (or get an advanced degree in another field). It’s really about your vision of how you can contribute to the human endeavor and be happy about your role and existence as a member of the global society. Our generation, shaped by war and poverty, had a simpler mandate—do everything we can to earn a living and put our children in a better economic footing. You have a much bigger mandate—save the world from its own excesses, ease the suffering of its inhabitants and make innovations to improve our state of being. It’s an ominous task! Once you figure out how you can help fulfill that mandate, the rest is easy…

One quick side-note, you mustn’t define a profession by dollars and cents or by a cost-benefit analysis. A janitor who is committed to his/her job can do more to advance the mandate than a medical researcher who lacks passion or ethics. You make a living by what you take, but you make a life by what you give. It’s not the degree, but what you do with it that counts.

"

- An email from my uncle who’s part-lawyer, part-genius, part-gandalf, part-dumbledore, part-careercounselor, part-wonderfulhumanbeing (via body-peace

(via paintspintspolkadots)

alltsar:

to everyone saying “what has happened to our world”

alltsar:

to everyone saying “what has happened to our world”

(via maghrabiyya)

humansofnewyork:

"The Zaatari Refugee Camp is twelve kilometers from the Syrian border, and has become the fourth largest city in Jordan. At its peak last year, over 3,000 Syrians refugees were entering the camp every day. This was a biblical level of population movement. Over 400,000 people have lived in the camp at some point in the last two years. UNHCR has responded to their basic needs: sanitation, food, healthcare. But there’s a large gap between survival and livelihood. For lack of a better word, boredom has become a big problem. It’s too dangerous to return to Syria, and there are very limited ways to be productive inside the camp. But the adaptations have been amazing. This is unlike any other refugee camp in the world. The Syrians are coming from a middle class economy, so they are a very skilled population— they aren’t subsistence farmers. They’ve managed to build an economy inside the camp. Most of the tents have been upgraded to houses. The refugees trade with the Jordanians, and bring in supplies from the outside to start their own shops. One man even started a supermarket. It’s still a tough situation. But arriving with nothing, the Syrian refugees have managed to carve out their own dignity inside the camp. They aren’t just taking what is given to them. They’ve created choices for themselves.” 
-Gavin White, UNHCR Jordan External Relations Officer

humansofnewyork:

"The Zaatari Refugee Camp is twelve kilometers from the Syrian border, and has become the fourth largest city in Jordan. At its peak last year, over 3,000 Syrians refugees were entering the camp every day. This was a biblical level of population movement. Over 400,000 people have lived in the camp at some point in the last two years. UNHCR has responded to their basic needs: sanitation, food, healthcare. But there’s a large gap between survival and livelihood. For lack of a better word, boredom has become a big problem. It’s too dangerous to return to Syria, and there are very limited ways to be productive inside the camp. But the adaptations have been amazing. This is unlike any other refugee camp in the world. The Syrians are coming from a middle class economy, so they are a very skilled population— they aren’t subsistence farmers. They’ve managed to build an economy inside the camp. Most of the tents have been upgraded to houses. The refugees trade with the Jordanians, and bring in supplies from the outside to start their own shops. One man even started a supermarket. It’s still a tough situation. But arriving with nothing, the Syrian refugees have managed to carve out their own dignity inside the camp. They aren’t just taking what is given to them. They’ve created choices for themselves.” 

-Gavin White, UNHCR Jordan External Relations Officer